Sunday, December 6, 2009

Mabel's 90th Birthday

Mabel's 90th Birthday
Mabel Leffel Baldwin - 90 years old
Our Grandmother, Mabel Edna Leffel, was born on 21 November 1900 in True, Young County, Texas, the daughter of Charles Edgar Leffel and Caldona Jane BoxMabel Leffel married Jesse W. Baldwin on Dec. 25, 1917, in Mountain Park, Oklahoma.  Jesse and Mabel had fourteen children.  They were married almost 55 years when Jesse died in 1972. 

On 21 Nov 1990, Grandma had a 90th Birthday Party in Chickasha, Oklahoma, where she was living at the time.  Family came from across the country (Massachusetts, California, Arizona, Utah, and Colorado) to wish Grandma a Happy 90th Birthday.

Mabel with Beverly, Verna, and Juanita.

Mabel with granddaughters: JoAnna and Cathy
After the dinner and party, someone asked grandma what she wanted to do special for her birthday.  Her response was to go to the races -- horse races that is.  So the next day, we all went to the Remington Park race track in Oklahoma City with Grandma for her 90th birthday celebration.


Mabel (bottom left) at the horse races with family for her 90th birthday celebration.
In the below photos, Grandma and her girls do a little birthday Hokey Pokey.
Put your right foot in, Put your right foot out.....



Family - That's what it's all about!

Thursday, December 3, 2009

FamilySearch

FamilySearch.org

I love-love-love FamilySearch.org and mainly for one reason - the Texas Death Records. Last year before the Texas Death records were added to Record Search, I spent $20 a piece for several death records from Texas. Since the database has gone online, I have probably copied close to 200 death records for ancestral relatives for free! Do the math. Information found in the death records has given mother's maiden names, broken down difficult brick-walls, helped to locate places of burial, etc, etc, and etc. :)

In addition to the Texas Deaths 1890-1976, FamilySearch.org has US Census Records, State Census records, Death Records for Ohio, Arizona, Michigan and other states, marriage records, Court Records, Probate Records, and the list just goes on and on.  International records are also available. All for FREE!!
Check back frequently for new collections that have been updated or added.

FamilySearch.org makes me want to do the genealogy happy dance! :)  Can you tell I'm excited or what about this site?

You can perform a search from the main Search page or go to a record collection.  The SEARCH page is found by simply clicking on the SEARCH icon found on the FamilySearch.org home page.  To search a specific record collection, scroll towards the bottom of the main SEARCH page to Browse by Location choose a location, then scoll through the record collections available for that location.  I usually first do a search on the main page, then will go to specific record collections for more specific searches.  All for FREE!!
Have fun finding your ancestors!

Wednesday, November 11, 2009

North and South

Since today is Veterans Day, I though I would try to list our Civil War Veterans.  We have family members who fought for the Union and family members who fought for the Confederate Army. 

In addition to direct ancestors, I will also list siblings of direct ancestors and spouses of siblings. 
I have added the family line the Civil War veteran can be found on if looking at my family tree.  They are listed for each of my great-grandparents lines: Martin, Weiss, Wilson, Hatfield, Baldwin, Stewart, Leffel, Box..  My trees at Ancestry.com may have the pension records added for the veteran.

(Name, (family line), State served from, pension Yes/No, Federal pension if Union or state pension if Confederate.)

Union Army
Leonard D. Hatfield, (Hatfield) Iowa, Y, Federal pension
Daniel S. Coddington, (Hatfield), Missouri, Y, Federal pension  (5 sons also fought in Civil War)
Andrew McNeil, (Hatfield), Indiana, Y-widows pension, Died during war
Levi Taylor Ball, (Hatfield), Indiana, Y, Federal Pension
Nathaniel McNeil, (Hatfield) Indiana, Y, Federal pension
Russell Westcott, (Hatfield), Wisconsin, Y, Federal Pension
Henry Westcott, (Hatfield), Wisconsin, Y, Federal Pension
Joel Leffel, (Leffel), Ohio, y-widows pension, Died during war his widow filed for pension.
Anthony Jones, (Leffel), Ohio
Ollie Gordon, (Leffel), Ohio, Y, Killed 14 May 1864 Battle at Resaca, GA
Henry Gordon, (Leffel), Ohio
Harrison Gordon, (Leffel), Ohio
Ezra Gordon, (Leffel), Ohio
Willis Miller, (Leffel), Ohio, Killed in battle at Beverly, WV
Harrison Miller, (Leffel), Ohio
Samuel Miller, (Leffel), Ohio
J. Peery Miller, (Leffel), Ohio
Milton J. Miller, (Leffel), Ohio, Chaplin
James Leffel, (Leffel), Ohio
Henry R. Stewart, (Stewart),Tennessee, Y, Federal pension
Jacob M. Stewart, (Stewart),Tennessee, Y, Federal pension
Gottlieb Weiss, (Weiss), Illinois

Let us not forget our grandpa, David Miller Leffel, who was hanged during the Civil War in the Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas 1862.  His crime -- having Union sympathies in Confederate Texas and not wanting to fight for the Confederates. So, although he did not die while in service, he died as a result of the war.



Confederate Army
Alan Baldwin, (Baldwin), Texas, N, ?died during war?
Benjamin F. Baldwin, (Baldwin), Texas, No pension found
Francis Marion Baldwin, (Baldwin),  Texas, No pension found
William Riley Medlin, (Baldwin), Tennessee, Y, Tennessee pension
Samuel L. Sadler, (Baldwin), Y, Texas pension
Elijah Lindley, (Baldwin), Texas
John Haning, (Leffel), Texas
Jesse F Thomas, (Leffel), Texas
Stephen Wesley Box, (Leffel), Texas
William B. Wilson, (Wilson), Texas, Y, Oklahoma pension
Fields Hoff, Texas, (Wilson), Texas, Y, Texas pension
Richard Huff, (Wilson), Texas, Y, Texas pension
Cosley Huff, (Wilson), Texas


Research:
Fold3.com
National Parks Service website, (Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System):


Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Jess and Mabel Baldwin

Jess and Mabel (Leffel) Baldwin
Headstones and Obituaries 

Jess and Mabel Baldwin
Mabel Leffel Baldwin and Jess William Baldwin are buried in the Grand View Cemetery in Montrose, Colorado.


Obituary for Jess Baldwin from the Montrose Daily Press:
Jess W. Baldwin of the Shavano community died Wednesday in Memorial Hospital. A retired rancher, he had resided in Colorado since 1937 and in the Montrose area since 1939. Born March 28, 1898 at Graham, Texas to Allen and Mary J. (Stewart) Baldwin, Jess W. Baldwin spent his early life in that vicinity.
On Dec. 25, 1917, he was married at Mountain Park, Oklahoma to Mabel E. Leffel. In addition to his wife, he is survivied by four sons and eight daughters: Joe H. and William A. Baldwin, Mrs. Dan (Ethel) Scott, and Mrs. Ken (Joan) Greenhalgh, all of Montrose; Jess V. and Jack H. Baldwin, Mesa, Arizona; Mrs. Dee (Leona) Coker and Mrs. C.L. (Esther) Neff, Camarillo, California; Mrs. Vernyle (Juanita) Thompson, Dolores; Mrs. Leroy (Verna) Martin, Cortez; Mrs. Dwayne (Glenda) Lichliter, Grand Junction; Mrs. Terry (Beverly) Rigler, Houston, Texas. One son and one daughter are deceased. There are 42 grandchildren and nine great grandchildren.
Brothers and sisters are Charlie Baldwin, Corcoran, California; Clyde Baldwin and Mrs. Betty Miller, Lancaster, California; Tom Baldwin, Stockton, California; Mrs. Maud Killian and Mrs. Ettie Barker, Mountain Park, Oklahoma.
Services will be conducted by Pastor A. J. Kubish Saturday at 2 p.m. from the First Baptist Church. Interment in Grand View Cemetery will be directed by the Valley Funeral Home.
Jesse Baldwin Headstone Carving

 Obituary for Mabel Edna Leffel Baldwin Martin from the Montrose Daily Press, 21 Mar 1995, Montrose, Colorado:

Mabel Baldwin Martin, 94, a resident of Delta for the past three years, died of a sudden illness on Saturday, March 18, 1995, in St. Mary's Hospital and Regional Medical Center at Grand Junction.
Funeral Services to honor Mrs. Baldwin-Martin's life will be officiated by the Rev. Jasper Weaver on Wednesday, March 22, at 3 p.m. from the Montrose First Assembly of God Church, 515 S. Hillcrest.
Interment will follow the service in the Grand View Cemetery, with arrangements being handled under the direction of the Montrose Valley Funeral Home.
Born in Graham, Texas on Nov. 21, 1900, Mabel Leffel was the daughter of Charles Edgar and Caldona Jane (Box) Leffel. She spent her childhood, received her education, and grew to adulthood in Chickasha, Oklahoma.
Miss Leffel married Jesse W. Baldwin on Dec. 25, 1917, in Mountain Park, Oklahoma.
In 1943, the Baldwins ran the sale barn in Montrose and then moved to Cortez and ran the sale barn there. Mrs. Baldwin, a homemaker, fried chicken, baked bread and pies for the Indians on the reservation near Cortez.
Mrs. Baldwin lost her husband, Jesse W. Baldwin, to death in 1972 at Montrose. She married Ernest Martin and the couple lived in Chickasha, Oklahoma. Mr. Martin preceded her in death in 1993, following a lengthy illness.
Mrs. Martin moved to Delta three years ago to live with her daughter, where she made her home until her death.
She is survived by three sons: Joe H. Baldwin of Montrose; Jack H. Baldwin of Sierra Vista, Ariz.; Buck Baldwin of Gilbert, Ariz.; seven daughters: Joan Brownen of Chickasha, Oklahoma; Ethel Taylor of Montrose; Beverly Wagner, Juanita Thompson, Glenda Pilgrim, all of Delta; Esther Neff of Camarillo, California; Verna Martin of Cortez; 47 grandchildren; 89 great-grandchildren; and 17 great-great-grandchildren.
In addition to both of her husbands and parents, Mrs. Martin was also preceded in death by four children: Billie Jean Baldwin, Weldon A. Baldwin, Jesse V. Baldwin and Sue Coker.
She was a member of the Church of Christ and the Rebekah Lodge.
Mrs. Martin played the organ and sang at her church. Her children remember her singing hymns around the house. She enjoyed quilting, sewed all her own clothing and was an avid gardener. She always had a meal for anyone who was hungry. In addition to her own 14 children, Mrs. Martin raised two grandchildren and two other children as well.

 
Below is a photo taken the day of Grandpa's funeral.  Grandma is in the center and surrounded by her children and Grandpa's brother, Tom Baldwin (without hat).
 
 

Find-A-Grave Memorial Pages
To view Jess's Find-A-Grave Memorial Page, click here.
To view Mabel's Find-A-Grave Memorial Page, click here.


Some other posts about Jess or Mabel: (click on the link):
1928 picture of the Mabel & Jess Baldwin family
Pictures of Grandpa on a horse.

Tuesday, September 22, 2009

Chester Cemetery, Griever and Estelle Oklahoma

According to Maymie, her grandma, Polly Huff Wilson, died about 1899 at the family home in Griever Canyon, Woods (now Major), Oklahoma and was buried in the Chester Cemetery.  No headstone has been found but there are several unreadable and unmarked stones.  We may never know if Grandma Polly Huff Wilson was really buried in the Chester Cemetery or on the Wilson farm at Greever.

Below is a picture of the road sign at Griever Creek, Oklahoma.


Here is an old map showing Chester, Estelle and Greever.  Maymie said she was born at Estelle in one record and at her grandpa Hatfield's homestead in another record -- are they one and the same??

Monday, September 21, 2009

Soldiers in Uniform - Bub & Kirby Leffel


"Bub" Charles Wesley Leffel & Kirby Leffel

Both, Kirby and Bub, registered for the World War I draft on 12 Sep 1918.  Bub registered in Comanche County, Oklahoma, where he was living at the time.  Kirby registered in Kiowa County.  Since they are in uniforms, they apparently were drafted and served in the army.  We have no record of their service at this time.  Both brothers were living at home with their wives and families in the 1920 census.

I love this picture, especially the female peeking out of the rear opening of the car.  Since both men were married at the time, the female peeking out of the rear window of the car could have been either one of their wives.

Kirby William Leffel and Charles Wesley "Bub" Leffel are the sons of Charles and Caldona Box Leffel.

Tuesday, September 8, 2009

Anna Belle Hatfield

Anna Belle Hatfield was the daughter of Martin Monroe Hatfield and Nancy Abigail McNeil.  Anna was born 12 Jan 1891 in Norton County, Kansas.  She moved to Oklahoma with her parents in 1899.  On the 24 of August 1910, Anna married Sidney H. Allen.

Anna Belle Hatfield and Sidney H. Allen 
Woodward County, Oklahoma


Marriage Notice for Anna Hatfield and Sidney Allen.
Quinlan Mirror. (Quinlan, Okla.), Vol. 8, No. 24, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 25, 1910

The last sentence in the above marriage notice wishes Anna and Sidney "a long and prosperous life."  Little did anyone know that in just over a year later, Anna would pass away.  According to family stories, Anna died from complications of childbirth on 18 Dec 1911.  She was buried in the Union Cemetery, Woods County, Oklahoma.

Obituary clipping found in family bible:
Obituary clipping from an unknown newspaper:
Mrs. Anna B. Allen died at her home in Quinlan, Monday morning after a short illness. Anna Belle Hatfield was born January 12, 1891, in Norton County, Kansas, and came to Oklahoma in 1899 with her parents. She was married to Sidney H. Allen August 24, 1910. She joined the Christian church at Quinlan in 1909 and was an active worker in church and Sunday School, being a delegate to the Sunday school convention at Alva last year. Her neighbors and friends all regard her life as a Christian to be above reproach and she was held in the high esteem by all who knew her.
She leaves a husband, father, mother, four brothers, three sisters and many friends to mourn her loss.
Funeral was held in the Christian church, Tuesday afternoon, conducted by Evangelist Adamson of Newton, and the body laid to rest in the Union cemetery.

Tuesday, August 25, 2009

"Pioneer in the new 'City of the Dead' at Dove Creek"

Martin Monroe Hatfield was the first burial in the Dove Creek Cemetery (Dove Creek, Colorado). His obituary states: "Mr. Hatfield has been three times a pioneer. His first being in Kansas, then Oklahoma, and two years ago he came to Colorado. He loved the pioneer life and it is fitting that he should become the pioneer in the new "City of the Dead" at Dove Creek."

The plaque attached to the headstone reads:
Martin M. Hatfield
1857-1918
First Grave in Cemetery

This next picture was taken in 2001 at the Dove Creek Cemetery looking south toward the location of where the Hatfield farm would have been.

Also buried in the Dove Creek Cemetery is Martin M. Hatfield's daughter, Lillie Smith, and his son, Charles O. Hatfield.

Obituary for Martin Monroe Hatfield:
The funeral services of Martin M. Hatfield, who died suddenly at Dove Creek Friday, were held at the Dove Creek school house Tuesday afternoon and were conducted by Rev. C. L. Flanders of the Dolores Baptist church. Music was furnished by a mixed quartet composed of O. J. Shultz, wife and daughter and Mr. McConnell. A large concourse of people were present to bear testimony of the esteem in which the deceased was held. His remains were laid to rest in the new cemetery at Dove Creek.
Martin Monroe Hatfield was born in Boone County, Iowa, April 18, 1857 and died at his home in Dove Creek, Colorado, May 31, 1918, at the age of 61 years, 1 month and 13 days. In early manhood he became a Christian and united with the Baptist Church and proved himself a good true Christian man. At the time of his death, he was superintendent of the Dove Creek Sunday School.
On New Year's Day, 1879, he was married to Nancy Abbagel McNeil at Smith County, Kansas. He leaves a wife, nine children, twelve grandchildren, three brothers and a host of friends to mourn his departure.
The deceased was a member of the Farmers Union of Dove Creek, which organization took charge of the burial. He took an active interest in all the affairs of the community that were for the benefit and uplift of the same.
The day before his death, he was at the farmer's meeting at Cahone and in the morning of his death ate a hearty breakfast and went about the place doing his usual chores. About the middle of the forenoon he was stricken with neuralgia of the heart and passed away before medical aid could reach him.
He was conscious to the last and realized his time had come and he gave directions to his loved ones as to his burial and their remaining together in this new country.
A plot of ground was selected on his farm for a cemetery and he was laid to rest amid the scenes of his hearts greatest desire while in this life.
Mr. Hatfield has been three times a pioneer. His first being in Kansas, then Oklahoma, and two years ago he came to Colorado. He loved the pioneer life and it is fitting that he should become the pioneer in the new "City of the Dead" at Dove Creek.


Find A Grave Memorial Pages for Martin and Nancy Hatfield: 
Martin Monroe Hatfield's Find A Grave: click here.
Nancy Abbagail McNeil Hatfield's Find A Grave: click here.


Monday, August 24, 2009

Family Record for the John McNeil Family of Parke County, Indiana

This is a family record of the John & Sally McNeil family of Parke county, Indiana.  This family record was found in the Nathaniel McNeil Civil War pension file.

In 1908, the youngest son of John and Sally McNeil, Nathaniel, needed to prove his birth date for his Civil War pension. Nathan had an old biographical dictionary (Lempriere's Biographical Dictionary) published in 1827 that had belonged to his father, John McNeil. Inside the dictionary was a written copy of the Family Record for John McNeil family. Nathan took this to a Notary Public in Garfield County, Oklahoma and the affidavit of the McNeil Family Record can found in Nathan's pension file.

*Note: There is one transcription error of the original. John's wife is listed as Dolly -- it should read Sally and was mistakenly transcribed at some point. The Mathew Miller included in the list is the father of Nathan's wife, Malinda Jane Miller. Nathan's two children are also listed.




Transcription of above record:
(Page 1)
State of Oklahoma,:
County of Garfield,:
Nathaniel McNeil, being first duly sworn on oath deposes and states:
That he was 75 years of age on the 14th day of October, 1907, and that he was born on the 14th day of October, 1832.
That there is not a public record of his birth, and no baptismal record of his birth, but that there is in his possession a family record of his birth, which was kept in a copy of “Lempriere’s Biographical Dictionary” which was published in 1827 by D.F. Robinson & Co., of Hartford, and which was kept by affiants father John McNeil, who was born March 18th 1784, as shown by said record, and the record then proceeds with the dates of birth of the various members of the family, and shows the name of Nathaniel Strong McNeil, born October 14, 1832, and which refers to, and is the name of the affiant, but that the affiant has since maturity cropped the middle name “Strong”, and has never used it as a part of his name since. That ever since the death of affiant’s father in 1852, the said family record has been in the possession of affiant.
Nathaniel McNeil (signed)
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 29th., day of January 1908.
Chalmers B. Wilson (signed)
Notary Pubic

(page 2)
COPY OF FAMILY RECORD.
A List of Ages.
John McNeil was born March 18th 1784.
Dolly (this is prob a transcriber error and should read Sally) McNeil was born in the (sic) of our lord 1791.
Our son John C. McNeil was born May 16th., 1814.
Thomas A. McNeil was born June 16th 1816.
William L. McNeil was born July 21st., 1818.
Neal McNeil was born June 23rd., 1820.
Sally Ann was born March the 20th., 1822.
Elizabeth was born February 29th., 1824.
James McNeil was born March 4th., 1826.
Pleasant McNeil was born January the 14th., 1828.
Andrew Sterling McNeil was born August 15th., 1830.
Nathaniel Strong McNeil was born Oct. 14th., 1832.
Violet Irene McNeil was born November the 28th., 1901.
Mathew Miller was born Feb. 7th 1839.
Lyoid Oliver Jay McNeil was born Sept. the 21st., 1904.

State of Oklahoma,:
County of Garfield,: SS:
I, Chalmers B. Wilson, a Notary Public in and for said State and County do hereby certify the above and fore-going copy of the family record showing the name and date of birth of Nathaniel McNeil, the affiant who has signed and sworn to the attached affadavit, to be a true and correct copy of said record taken from the book described in said affadavit. The entire record including the name of Nathaniel Strong McNeil was made with old, acid ink, and no erasures, and the names after that beginning with Violet Irene McNeil have been made later with an entirely different ink. The said book of record was published in 1827, and ? I believe the writing to have been done at about the dates mentioned. Done at Enid Oklahoma this 29th., day of January 1908. Chalmers B. Wilson, Notary Public
.

**Note: Information found online about the above mentioned book.
"Lempriere's Biographical Dictionary" was published in Hartford by the D.F. Robinson & Co. in 1827. Author was John Lempriere. The book was made with period full leather binding, gilt-tooled smooth spine, and had engraved frontis showing portraits of historical figures. The book measured 4 1/2" W x 7 1/2" H and was 444 pages. Full title: Lempriere’s Biographical Dictionary, or Sketches of the lives and Celebrated Characters in Every Age and Nation. Embracing warriors, heroes, poets, philosophers, historians, divines, [etc.]. Also: Notices of One Hundred Eminent Living Individuals

Sunday, August 23, 2009

McNeil Cemetery, Parke County, Indiana


McNeil Cemetery is in a small grove of trees in the middle of a field (private property) in Raccoon township in Parke County, Indiana. Several years ago, we were able to travel to Parke County. The present owner of the land that our John C. McNeil owned, was kind enough to walk us out to the cemetery and help us find the headstones. All of the headstones had fallen over and were covered with overgrowth and leaves. We had to poke around through the leaves & brush until we felt the hard headstones. Then we wiped and cleaned everything off of the top of the headstones and then took pictures.

This first headstone is our ancestor, John C. McNeil (1784-1852). John was the owner of the land the cemetery is located on.
These next two headstones are of John McNeil's brother, Thomas Hargis McNeil (1795-1850), and his wife, Malinda McNeil (1806-1859).
This last picture is of the present owner of the land and yours truly. We are in front of his barn and workshop. He was writing down his name and address for me. After I got back home, I sent him histories of our McNeil ancestors who lived so many years ago on the property he now owns.

Monday, August 10, 2009

Michael & Mary (Fulcher) Box Family

Michael & Mary Fulcher Box Family

Michael Box was born about 1780 in Laurens, South Carolina. He was the son of James and Mary Box. (Records created by Thomas Box, son of Michael Box, indicated that the parents of Michael Box were James and Mary Box.)  Michael's father, James Box, apparently died.  His mother, Mary Box, may have then married William Hellums.  William and Mary Box Hellums had three children:  John Hellums, Mary Hellums (Johnson) and Anna Hellums (Johnson).  Throughout his life, Michael Box continued a close relationship with his Hellums half-siblings.  Michael Box died on 20 Jan 1841 in Tippah, Mississippi.
Michael married Mary Fulcher daughter of Cason Fulcher about 1797. Mary was born in 1779 in South Carolina. She died in Feb 1841 or 1844.
Michael and Mary Box had known seven children.  Their names in order of birth are as follows: James Francis Box (1798-1860), William M. Box (1801-1838), Thomas Box (1804-1881), Mary Box (1806-1860s), John Box (1810-1850s), Lydia Box (1810-1856), and Grief Johnson Box (1819-1874).  Since there is a big gap between the last two children, it is possible that there were more children that possibly died young.



The following is from a collection of Box researchers:
  • Michael Box, born about 1780, moved from Laurens County SC to Knox County, TN where his sons, James Francis Box, William and Thomas were born. Michael had married Mary Fulcher, daughter of Cason Fulcher, about 1798 in Tennessee. Wade in The Box Book indicates Michael Box was performing marriages in Knox County TN in 1809. By 1810, he was on the tax rolls of Madison County, Mississippi Territory (which became Madison County, Alabama) and his sons, John Box and Grief Johnson Box and his daughters Mary Box and Lydia Box were born in Alabama. During the War of 1812, he was a private in the 16th Regt. of Mississippi Territory militia. He served with his brother-in-law, Grief Johnson, husband of half-sister, Mary Hellums Johnson. They were apparently good friends, because Michael would later name his youngest son, Grief Johnson Box. In the 1815-1817 census of Mississippi Territory he was listed as Michael Box, 1 male over 21; 4 males under 21; 1 female over 21 and 2 females under 21; along with a Benjamin Box.On Feb. 28, 1818, Michael Box, his wife, Mary, and Mary Hellums, were received into membership of Bethel Baptist Church in Tuscaloosa County, AL. In the Census of 1830, Fayette County, AL, Michael Box, age 50 to 60, is listed along with his sons , William and John. The 1830 census for Michael lists the following household members (my guess to who they were in parentheses) : Males: 1 under 5 (?), 1 age 10-15 (Grief J. Box), 1 age 50-60 (Michael Box); Females: 1 age 20-30 (Lydia Box), 1 age 50-60 (Mary Box). On August 2, 1838, Michael, William, and John Box made application for Land Patents on Quarter Sections of land in Tippah County, Mississippi. The Certificate Numbers were 961 for Michael Box and 962 for William Box and both were for land that had been previously assigned to Joseph Warren Mathews. On November 16,1840, Lewis Garret and Thomas Box obtained a Land Patent for Quarter Section that was located in the area that became Benton County, MS. On November 28, 1843, Grief Johnson Box obtained a Land Patent for a Quarter Section. The 1840 Census of Tippah County, MS lists Michael Box, his sons Thomas, Grief J., and John and Elizabeth “Elspeth” Box, Michael’s daughter-in-law and widow of William Box. This Michael Box died intestate in 1841 according to Mississippi Supreme Court records and his wife, Mary, shortly after. The court records also state that Michael's estate started probate in January term 1844 in Tippah County, MS. (Note: Son, Thomas, states his father, Michael died 20 Jan 1844 and his mother, Mary, died in Feb 1844. But since probate started in Jan 1844, the 1841 year of death given in the court records is probably correct.) In 1846, his son, Grief J. Box, as administrator of Michael Box’s estate was sued by, Lydia Box McCollum, as a daughter of Michael Box. The value of Michael Box’s estate at the time of his death was appraised at nearly two thousand dollars with debts totaling less than thirty five dollars.Known children of Michael Box and his wife, Mary Fulcher Box: James Frances Box, William M. Box, Thomas Box, Mary Box Henderson, Lydia Box McCollum, John Box and Grief Johnson Box. Son, Thomas Box, became a member of the LDS Church in Texas in 1856 and provided family information to the church that indicated his father, Michael Box, was the son of James and Mary Box. Thomas also stated he was a grand-nephew of Stephen F. Box and 2nd cousin to Rolan Box (son of John Morris Box). That would make Thomas' grandfather, James Box, a brother to Stephen F. Box and John Morris Box. Upon the apparent death of Michael's father, James Box, his mother, Mary Box, married William Hellums. Mary Box Hellums' children with William Hellums became Michael Box's half siblings: half-brother, John Hellums and half-sisters, Mary Hellums and Anna Hellums. That would accout for Michael Box's close relationship to the Hellums family. Michael's son, Grief Johnson Box, married his half-cousin, Roenna Johnson, daughter of Anna Hellums Johnson.

Children of Michael and Mary (Fulcher) Box:

1. James Frances Box was born about 1798 in Tennessee. He died in Mar 1860 in Kaufman, Texas.
James married (1) Penina Babb  on 15 Jan 1817 in  Madison, Alabama. Penina was born about 1800 in Alabama. She died before May 1826.
James married (2) Elizabeth Matthews daughter of Joseph Cromwell Matthews and Penina Crisp on 15 May 1826 in  Lawrence, Alabama. Elizabeth was born about 1809 in , Madison, Alabama. She died in Aug 1850 in Titus, Texas. She was buried in Titus, Texas. James married (3) Jane Goddard on 10 Dec 1852 in , Navarro, Texas.

2. William M. Box was born about 1801 in Tennessee. He died on 19 Dec 1838.
William married Elizabeth. Elizabeth was born about 1804 in Georgia. What happened to Elizabeth and her children after 1840 is not known at this time.  There are a few Box's of unknown parentage that end up in Texas.  Could they be the children of William Box??  Martin VanBuren Box and Liddie Camella Box are two possible children.  Liddie Camella Box descendants have shared DNA matches with descendants of Grief Johnson Box.

3. Thomas Box was born on 8 Aug 1804 in Timbercrest, Knox, Tennessee. He died on 17 Mar 1881 in Farmington, San Juan, New Mexico.
Thomas married (1) Clarkey Carpenter daughter of Richard E. Carpenter and Nancy Holliday about 1830. Clarkey was born on 15 Dec 1812 in Amherst, Virginia. She died about 1881 in San Juan, New Mexico. She was buried in Fruitland Cemetery, San Juan, Mexico. Thomas married (2) Belinda Marden daughter of John Marden and Rachel Shaw on 10 Jul 1858 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. Belinda was born on 24 Dec 1820 in Chichester, Merrimack, New Hampshire. She died on 19 Feb 1894 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. She was buried on 21 Feb 1894 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. They separated (divorced?) prior to 1870.

4. Mary Box was born about 1806 in Madison, Alabama. She died between 1860 and 1876 in Texas.
Mary married Hugh G. Henderson son of John Henderson and Nancy McLaurin about 1825 in Alabama. Hugh was born about 1796 in North Carolina. He died in 1855 in Titus, Texas.

5. Lydia Box was born about 1808 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. She died 1856 in Henderson County, Texas.  Lydia married George McCollum about 1830. George was born about 1805 in South Carolina. He died 1855 in Henderson County, Texas. Their known children were Martha, Mary, Melissa, George W., and William.  The family moved to Henderson County,Texas about 1850.  Lydia's brother, Thomas Box, was also living in Henderson County, Texas in 1850.
  • From the LDS church records, Thomas Michael Box, (son of Thomas Box) states that
    he is the "Nephew-in-law" to George McCullom and Clarkey Carpenter Box stated that
    she was the "sister-in-law" to Lydia Box and "aunt-in-law" to Martha McCullom.
    With the Mississippi Supreme court records (January Term 1847), we now know that
    Lydia Box married George McCollum.
    A plat map of Fayette county, Alabama shows George McCollum owning
    land in the same township as John Hellums & Mary Hellums. Lydia
    McCollum also owned land. Hugh G. Henderson (Mary Box Henderson) also owned land in
    the same township. So, we know that George & Lydia were married while living in
    Fayette County, Alabama. (Lots of McCollums in Fayette county!) Luke Johnson, who married Anna Hellums, also owns land in Fayette County.
    George & Lydia McCollum and family (ar least 1 son & 3 daughters) can be found in the
    1840 Tippah County, MS census and 1845 Tippah, Mississippi State Census.
    The Supreme Court case was in January, 1847.
  • George McCollum Probate can be found in the Henderson County, Texas Probate records.
6. John Box was born about 1810 in Alabama. He died before 1874.  It is not known if John Box was married or had a family.

7. Grief Johnson Box was born about 1819 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. He died on 12 Jan 1874 in Cooke, Texas. No gravesite has been found.
Grief married Roenna Johnson daughter of Luke Johnson and Anna Hellums about 1838 in Tippah, Mississippi. Roenna was born on 15 Oct 1822 in Alabama. She died on 3 Apr 1904 in Rush Springs, Grady, Oklahoma. She was buried in Apr 1904 in Rush Springs Cemetery, Grady, Oklahoma. Roenna and Grief would have been a half cousins to each other.

Please help with the below questions concerning the Michael & Mary Fulcher Box Family:
1. What became of son, William Box's, family after the 1840 census? Did his wife Elizabeth marry again? Did the children stay in Tippah county?
2. Did son, John, marry? Have children? If married, was his wife's name Margaret?


Sources (This family with sources and documentation can be found on Ancestry.com on the Leffel Box Family tree.)
1. Tax List , 1816 Resident's List, Monroe County, Alabama Territory.
2. 1830 U.S. Census , Alabama, Fayette County, pg 209.
3. 1840 U.S. Census , Mississippi, Tippah County, pg 209, 1 Jun 1840.
4. Family Information from David E. Box, Jr., 5726 Ridgetown Circle, Dallas, Texas 75230; Nov 1991.

5. International Genealogical Index , Family History Library, 35 N. West Temple Street, Salt Lake City, Utah 84150, USA, http://www.familysearch.org/. Michael Box's son,Thomas Box, joined the Mormon Church (Church of Jesus Christ of LatterDay Saints) and in 1856 moved from Henderson, Texas to Salt Lake City, Utah. In the 1870's Thomas and his wife, Clarkey Carpenter Box, became involved with Temple work for their deceased relatives & ancestors.The following are the relationships Thomas & Clarkey gave for the Box family: In 1874 & 1876 Thomas states he was the son of MICHAEL BOX who was born 1780 South Carolina and died 30 Jan 1844; Thomas's wife, Clarkey, states she was the daughter-in-law to Mary FULCHER who was born 1779 in South Carolina and died Feb 1844."
6. Church Records. "Bethel Baptist Church Register, Alabama Records, Volume V, 50, Hunstville Public Library, Huntsville, Alabama.Record of the Baptist Church of Bethel Falls of Black Warrior, Constituted of 31 day of January, 1818.John Hellums a founding member.Michael Box and wife, Mary Box, were received into membership of the Bethel Baptist Church, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama on 28 Feb 1818."
7. Newspaper , Southern Sentinel, Ripley, Mississippi, 5 Nov 1934.
8. Timeline for Michael Box.
9. USGenWeb , </ http:="">, Fayette County, Alabama USGenWeb. Michael Box ~ Voting precinct established at his residence, 1824

10. Land/Deed Records , Tippah County, Mississippi, 1838.
11. International Genealogical Index , FHL#1149522, 5 Aug 1874.
12. International Genealogical Index Mary's last name of Fulcher comes from IGI -- Endowment house records of 1874 & St. George Temple records of 1878.In 1874 & 1878, Thomas Box performed temple work for his father, Michael Box and Thomas' wife, Clarkey Carpenter Box, performed temple work for her mother-in-law, Mary FULCHER Box. FHL#1149523Endowment House Baptisms for the dead, 1857-1876, heir index, 1855-1876Vol. F, page 429, Ref # 20373 Thomas had his parents "sealed" in the St. George, Utah Temple on 27 Nov 1878.  Michael Box born 1780 South Carolina,   Mary Fulcher born 1779 South Carolina, died Feb 1844 St. George Sealings, Book B, FHL#170596
13. International Genealogical Index. St. George Temple Sealings, Book B, FHL#170596.
14. International Genealogical Index. Film Number: 1149523 Page Number: 429 Reference number: 20373
15. International Genealogical Index .
16. Will . Kaufman County Konnections, Vol. 14, Number 3 (September 1995), p. 37._Published by the Kaufman County Genealogical Society, Terrell, TX_WILL OF JAMES F. BOX_STATE OF TEXAS_COUNTY OF KAUFMAN_17. Family Information from David E. Box.
18. Land/Deed Records .
19. 1840 U.S. Census , Texas, Red River County.
20. Mullins, Marion Day, 1846 Republic of Texas Poll List , Baltimore [Maryland] : Genealogical Pub. Co., c1974, Titus County, Texas, 976.4 R4m - FHL US/CAN Book.
21. County & Town Histories. Box, James F. History of Titus County Texas, Vol II pages 19, 51
22. Periodical. James F. Box, 1859 Will, Kaufman Co., Tx_Surname: Box, Volume: 14 Number: 3 (September 1995)_Periodical Title: Kaufman Kounty Konnections
23. Land/Deed Records , http://www.rootsweb.com/~txtitus/a_titus.txt.
24. 1850 U.S. Census , Texas, Titus, pg 131, hh 532, 7 Oct 1850.
25. Online Family Web Site . http://home.nc.rr.com/rwbaird/hayes/Solomon%20Hayes.htm#_ftn26; BOB'S GENEALOGY FILING CABINET; Solomon Hayes
26. 1860 U.S. Mortality Schedule . Surname: James F. Box Year: 1860 County: Kaufman CO. State: TX Age: 60 Gender: M (Male) Month of Death: Mar State of Birth: AL ID#: MRT197_32063 Occupation: FARMER Cause of Death: BRONCHITUS Source Information: Jackson, Ron V., Accelerated Indexing Systems, comp.. U.S. Federal Census Mortality Schedules Index [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 1999
27. 1860 U.S. Mortality Schedule , Texas, Kaufman County.
28. International Genealogical Index , FHL#1149523, 21 Jun 1876.
29. Marriage Record . Madison County, AL Marriage Records: Book 1, Page 334 License granted on 15 July 1817 James Box & "Bemima Bob"."
30. Ancestry.com , Copyright © 1998-2006, MyFamily.com Inc., Provo, UT, Alabama Marriages, 1807-1902; http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=7838.
31. 1830 U.S. Census , Alabama, Fayette County.
32. State Census , 1845 Mississippi State Census, Tippah County.
33. 1840 U.S. Census .
34. International Genealogical Index , FHL#1149522, 5 Aug 1874.
35. 1840 U.S. Census .
36. 1850 U.S. Census .
37. 1840 U.S. Census , Mississippi, Tippah County.
38. 1850 U.S. Census , Texas, Henderson County, pg 259/127, 15 Sep 1850.
39. 1860 U.S. Census , Utah, Salt Lake County, Salt Lake City 13th Ward, 1 Jun 1860.
40. 1870 U.S. Census , Utah, Salt Lake County, Salt Lake City 17th Ward, 30 Jun 1870.
41. International Genealogical Index .
42. Probate Record , Henderson County, Texas.
43. Land/Deed Records , Tippah County, Mississippi Deed Book D.
44. Land/Deed Records , Texas General Land Office.
45. Periodical , Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Vol 66 Issue 4, page 516-546, Apr 1963.
46. Timeline .
47. Court Record , Salt Lake County, Utah Civil and Criminal Case Files, 1852-1887.
48. Book , Utah Since Statehood, Volumes 1-4.
49. City Directories , 1863 & 186Salt Lake City Directories.
50. Land/Deed Records , Salt Lake County, Utah Land Records, FHL#929288.
51. Land/Deed Records , Henderson County, Texas.
52. Court Record , Henderson County, Texas.
53. Newspaper , Pioche, Nevada Court Proceedings -- SF Newspaper.
54. Book , Division of Animal Industry Brand Book, Utah, Dec 1874.
55. Book .
56. Newspaper , LOS ANGELES STAR VOL VIII, Saturday, 7 Nov 1857, No. 25.
57. International Genealogical Index .
58. Patriarchal Blessing Index , FHL #392638, Church History Archives and Library, LDS Church Historical Department, Archives/Library, 50 E. North Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 84150.
59. Obituary , http://www.lib.utah.edu/digital/unews/.
60. Book .
61. Church Records .
62. Church Records .
63. Church Records , LDS, Early Church Information File.
64. Patriarchal Blessing Index , FHL #392638.
65. Church Records .
66. International Genealogical Index .
67. 1860 U.S. Census , Utah, Salt Lake County, Salt Lake City 13th Ward, 1 Jun 1860.
68. Patriarchal Blessing Index , FHL #392638.
69. Obituary , Deseret News, 20 Feb 1894.
70. 1860 U.S. Census , Texas, Titus, Prec. 11, Snow Hill P.O., pg 49, 1 Aug 1860.
71. 1830 U.S. Census , Alabama, Fayette County.
72. 1840 U.S. Census , Mississippi, Tippah County.
73. 1850 U.S. Census , Texas, Titus County, pg 96-97, 10 Sep 1850.
74. Land/Deed Records , Tippah County, Mississippi Deed Book D.
75. County & Town Histories , http://www.rootsweb.com/~msgenweb/county-hist/index.htm.
76. Land/Deed Records .
77. Land/Deed Records , Texas General Land Office.
78. Court Record , Cases argued and decided in the Supreme Court of Mississippi ..., page 619, 1847, January Term.
79. 1830 U.S. Census , Alabama, Fayette County, pg 209.
80. 1840 U.S. Census , Tippah County, Mississippi.
81. State Census , 1845 Mississippi State Census, Tippah County.
82. Court Record , Cases argued and decided in the Supreme Court of Mississippi ..., page 619, 1847, January Term.
83. 1840 U.S. Census , Tippah County, Mississippi.
84. State Census , 1845 Mississippi State Census, Tippah County.
85. International Genealogical Index , FHL#1149522, 5 Aug 1874.
86. 1840 U.S. Census , Mississippi, Tippah County.
87. 1850 U.S. Census , Arkansas, Dallas County, Polk twp, pg 07.
88. 1860 U.S. Census , Arkansas, Bradley County, Smith twp., pg 492a.
89. 1870 U.S. Census , Texas, Hunt County, Timber Creek P.O., pg 50/439.
90. State Census , 1845 Mississippi State Census, Tippah County.
91. Timeline for Grief Johnson Box.
92. Land/Deed Records , Cooke County, Texas.
93. Probate Record , Hopkins County, Texas.
94. Land/Deed Records , Hunt County, Texas.
95. Tax List , Cooke County, Texas.
96. Deed Record , Cooke County, Texas Deed Records, Book 70(?), pg 212, 20 Feb 1905.
97. 1860 U.S. Census , Bradley County, Arkansas.
98. Voting Registration or Lists , 1867 Voter's Registration of Texas.
99. Church Records .
100. 1880 U.S. Census , Texas, Cooke County, Prec. 1, pg 209/34 B, 19 Jun 1880.
101. 1900 U.S. Census , Texas, Jack County.
102. Deed Record , Cooke County, Texas Deed Records, Book 70(?), pg 212, 20 Feb 1905.
103. Death Index .
104. Cemetery Records . Rush Springs Cemetery, Headstone:"Roenna, wife of G. J. Box, Born Oct 15, 1822, Died April 3, 1901"Rush Springs, Grady, Oklahoma
105. Headstone . Rush Springs Cemetery, Rush Springs, Grady County, Oklahoma.  Roenna Box, wife of G. J. Box Born Oct. 15. 1822 Died April 3. 1901 An "open book" engraved on the top of the headstone reads: "All the ends of the world shall remember and turn unto the Lord and all the kindreds of the nations shall worship thee. Psalms 22:27" Engraved at the bottom of the headstone: "She is gone to the land where the weary Enjoy the sweet rapture of sacred repose."

Sunday, August 9, 2009

Miller Homestead, Clark County, Ohio

Frederick Miller Homestead, Clark County, Ohio



In 1818 Frederick and Elizabeth Peery Miller left their home in Botetourt County, Virginia to make a new home in Clark County, Ohio. Frederick bought a quarter section, containing forty acres of cleared land, located in Bethel township, six miles west of Springfield, Ohio. A cabin on that land was their home until 1822 when the above pictured building of hewn logs was erected. It was built two stories, with a central hall and four rooms. By records dated 1823, Peter Minnich and Peter Marquart did the carpenter work. Beaded mantles, partitions, joists and paneled doors, unusual in log houses in primitive settlements, gave beauty of finish to the structure. Its broad faced poplar logs with the white stripes of lime mortar between made an impressive view.

Frederick Miller 1760-1822 died during the erection of this house. As a widow then Elizabeth was to have a separate room in the new house. She chose as her own the east room on the first floor with its huge fireplace.
In later years other occupants of this house would build around the original structure making it a part of their home. It was still being used in 1912.
Miller land as it looks now.

Frederick & Mary Elizabeth (Peery) Miller

The following was taken from the book: "The Genealogy of the Descendants of Frederick and Mary Elizabeth Peery Miller" by John Peery Miller (Yellow Springs, Ohio: Antioch College, 1913). The Genealogy of the Descendants of Frederick and Mary Elizabeth Peery Miller was compiled by their grandson John Peery Miller, Professor of History, Antioch College, Yellow Springs, Ohio in 1913.
Descendants of Frederick and Mary Elizabeth Peery Miller
The Frederick and Elizabeth Peery Miller Family

Frederick Miller (1760-1822) and his wife, Mary Elizabeth Peery (1769-1844), were both raised in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. After their marriage, they migrated to the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia. Their seven children were born in Botetourt County, Virginia, 1789-1811. The family migrated to Clark County, Ohio in 1818. Frederick bought a quarter section, containing forty acres of cleared land, located in Bethel township, six miles west of Springfield.
Frederick Miller died during the construction of their house in Clarke County in 1822. Frederick and Mary Elizabeth Miller are buried in the Bethel Cemetery, Bethel Township, Clark County, Ohio.

Frederick and Elizabeth were the parents of  SEVEN (7) children:  (1) Mary 1789-1850, md Anthony Leffel;  (2) Henry 1791-1866, md Charity Vantassel and Sarah Beaty;  (3) Elizabeth 1796-1874, md James P Leffel;  (4) John 1798-1863, md Joanna Smith;  (5) Daniel 1802-1878, md Elizabeth Neff ; (6) David 1805-1967, md Sarah Smith; and (7) Delilah 1811-1863, md William Gordon.

Our line descends through their daughter Mary, who married Anthony Leffel.  Click on the pages to enlarge.


Click on page to enlarge


The whole story may be read below:





Note: A scanned copy of this book in it's entirety is available on FamilySearch.org.  Click on the Search tab, then Books, and then search for Frederick Miller. 


Saturday, July 4, 2009

Our Family Blacksmiths


We have had a few blacksmiths in the family. The first family blacksmith that comes to mind is great-grandpa Henry Stewart. Henry's father, Harrison Stewart, and several of his sons were also blacksmiths. Above is a letterhead/logo found on a letter in Henry's Civil War pension file.


"THE VILLAGE BLACKSMITH"

Under a spreading chestnut tree
The village smithy stands;
The smith, a mighty man is he,
With large and sinewy hands;
And the muscles of his brawny arms
Are strong as iron bands.

His hair is crisp, and black, and long,
His face is like the tan:
His brow is wet with honest sweat,
He earns whate'er he can,
And looks the whole world in the face,
For he owes not any man.

Week in, week out, from morn till night,
You can hear his bellows blow,
You can hear him swing his heavy sledge,
With measured beat and slow,
Like a sexton ringing the village bell,
When the evening sun is low.

And children coming home from school
Look in at the open door;
They love to see the flaming forge,
And hear the bellows roar,
And catch the burning sparks that fly
Like chaff from a threshing floor.

He goes on Sunday to the church,
And sits among his boys;
He hear the parson pray and preach,
He hears his daughter's voice,
Singing in the village choir,
And it makes his heart rejoice.

It sounds to him like her mother's voice,
Singing in Paradise!
He needs must think of her once more,
How in the grave she lies;
And with his hard, rough hand he wipes
A tear out of his eyes.

Toiling,--rejoicing,--sorrowing,
Onwards through life he goes;
Each morning sees some task begin,
Each evening sees it close;
Something attempted, something done,
Has earned a night's repose.
Thanks, thanks to thee, my worthy friend,
For the lesson thou hast taught!
Thus at the flaming forge of life
Our fortunes must be wrought;
Thus on its sounding anvil shaped
Each burning deed and thought!

By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Sunday, May 31, 2009

Hous Holt's Pardon


(Transciption at bottom of this post)

Northly Houston Holt, commonly known as Hous Holt, was married to Sarah Ann West, daughter of John & Barbara (Harmon) West. John West was the brother to our director ancestor, Susan Evaline West Leffel.

Hous Holt got into a fight with his wife's uncle, John Haning (husband of Rebecca West Haning). John lost his eyesight and was blind the rest of his life. Some say it was a gun fight in a saloon. The minutes of the Old Settler's Association of Grayson County, Vol. 1, gives the following report of the fight: "This is the man (John Haning) who lost his eyesight in 1870 through the merciless attack of a desperado named Hous Holt, well known to our community and now wearing stripes for murder."  An 1879 newspaper article from Denison Daily News (Denison, Texas) states the following: "This famous desperado, is the same who punched out the eyes, with a pistol, of a man now in Sherman being led about by a little boy."
Denison Daily News, 9 April 1879
In 1878, Houston Holt was charged with murder in two cases. First was the 1878 murder of a man by the name of Powers for a remark about his horse (Sherman Daily Register). Hous was also charged with a second murder that had occurred years earlier. This was the murder of a man named Beard who has accused Houston Holt's father of being a member of an insurrection party. He was mostly referring to the "Peace Party" or Unionist party that had so many members hanged in the Great Hanging at Gainesville in neighboring Cooke County.

Houston was not charged with killing Beard until after the charges of killing Powers was filed against him. He was found guilty of both murders and sentenced to life-time or a total of 104 years in prison (99 years plus 5).

In the 1880 census, N.H. Holt listed in the Huntsville, Walker County, Texas as an inmate in prison. His wife Sara is listed in the 1880 Denton County, Texas with her two children by Holt, James & Ninnie, and her son by Calvin Dale, John F. Dale.

In the 1890 Veteran Schedule, which was suppose to list only Union Veterans, N. H. Holt is listed in the Rusk Penitentiary, Texas. No records have been found to support his service in the Union or Confederate armies. His obituary, states that he was a confederate veteran.

In 1894, Houston Holt was pardoned by Governor Hogg after serving 15 years for the murder of Beard and Powers. (Sherman Daily Register, Friday, 8 June 1894)

Sarah divorced Hous prior to 1887 when she married again in 1887 to George Mead. She would live the rest of her life in Vermilion, Illinois where in 1919 she died and was buried. Their daughter, Nina, died in 1886 shortly after the birth of her only daughter. Son, James, died in 1908, when he was hit by a train.

Northley H. Holt can be found in the 1910 census for Denton County, Texas. He is living alone and states he is a widower. He also stated he was a veteran of the Civil War.

Houston lived out his life in Denton County, Texas. He married again to a Mrs. Polly Solomon, who was left his widow. Hous died 20 Apr 1915 at his home near Club Lake community in Denton County, Texas and was buried in the Cooper Creek Cemetery.
Obituary: Denton Record Chronicle; N. Houston Holt; Death 20 Apr 1915; obit 21 Apr 1915


Transcription of the newspaper article at begining of this post:
Hous Holt's Pardon (News Article) Date: 1894-06-08; Paper: Dallas Morning News Historical Archive
HOUS HOLT’S PARDON
Sentenced to One Hundred and Four Years in the Texas Penitentiary.
After serving Fifteen Years He is Liberated by Executive Clemency – Holt’s Experience within the Wall – The Crime
Seated at the corner of a grocery store here was a man surrounded by a good sized crowd of auditors. He was Houston Holt, who was the past week pardoned by Gov. Hogg after serving fourteen years in the state penitentiary on a 104 years sentence. He was convicted of murder in two cases, first for killing an old man named Beard during the war. The killing was said to be the results of an accusation that Holt’s father was a member of some insurrection party. The last killing was about the year 1878 and was brought on by some remarks made by Powers about a horse Holt was riding and trying to trade.
The versions of the killing are told differently and the opinions about them are diverse. One fact, however, is that Holt was not tried for the killing of the old man Beard until after the charge of murdering Powers was filed against him. The first trial was for the murder of Beard and was before the late Judge Joseph A. Carroll. A conviction was had, as heretofore stated, which resulted in a life-time sentence or ninety-nine years. The other case was tried in Cooke county on a change of venue and resulted in a conviction and a five years sentence.
The “Hous” Holt, as he was familiarly known, was a hale and hearty man, had a long beard, large brilliant blue eyes and he possessed activity uncommon for a man of age. Now he is minus the beard, with a face which looks careworn and wrinkled. The cases are notable and at the time they were disposed to attract wide attention. The best legal talent was employed on both sides, the state was represented by Judge J. Millert (?), who is now on the court of criminal appeals. Senator ___ C. Smith, Messrs. Lovejoy and Dickson and District Judge D. E. Barrett. The defense had such counsel as the late Gov. Throckmorton, Judge Hare of Sherman and Judge Piner of Denton.
“The penitentiary is a peculiar place,” he told those who stood around him. “I was there long enough to find out what it is, and I want to say that people have a deluded idea regarding the place. Prisoners there are treated humanely, and not abused, as I have heard. During my fifteen years’ confinement there I was only in the hospital five days. When I first went there I was closely watched. I knew I was and I determined to impress upon the officers that I was not such a bad man as I was reported to be, although then I bore a terrible name. Privately one day Capt. West came to me and said: ‘Holt, we have been receiving some letters from Denton county giving you a hard name, but I have watched your course since have been here and I do not think you are as bad a man as you are reported to be.’
“I thanked the captain very kindly and told him that he could rely upon my doing a man’s part. And I did it. No matter what kind of labor I was ordered to do, I did it if I was able, and as a result I fared better and am her today to begin life anew. I know a man that you Denton county people are acquainted with, sent from Wise county, who is now studying medicine in the penitentiary, and is making wonderfully rapid progress. He is a bright fellow, and being trained by such skill as the penitentiary affords, cannot but make a success.
“I never was whipped,” he continued. “The nearest I ever came to receiving the licks was on an occasion when I was called to Superintendent Goree’s office and told that I was guilty of insubordination and mutiny. I was charged along with a number of others. When my turn came I demanded to know of the superintendent who had made the charge against me. He replied a convict, hereupon I replied that no convict would dare come before him in my presence and make the charge, and I requested that I be given a chance to defend myself. The case against me was dismissed.
“But those days are past and gone. Let them be what they are, but from now on Houston Holt will found a different man. I have tasted of the bitter, and now it is time to enjoy the sweet.”
Such is the history of a man whose name was a household word throughout north Texas fifteen years ago.
Judge F. E. Piner, who defended Holt in both cases and who has worked unceasingly for his pardon was asked how it came about that Gov. Hogg pardoned Holt. He said: “The main reason, I suppose, why Gov. Hogg pardoned Holt was that Holt ought never to have been indicted or convicted for the killing of Beard. I have no disposition to exercise or find fault with those extra patriotic citizens of Texas, who during the dark days of the war took the law into their own hands and executed men for political opinion. Communities in those dark and bloody days were easily wrought up into a state of unreasoning excitement, and upon very slight evidence or no evidence at all took the lives of those who differed from them on the questions of the hour. Holt killed Beard because that man caused an angry and excited mob to arrest his (Holt’s) old father and because he was arraigned on false testimony before the then influential vigilance committee as the leader or a member of a secret society of union men whose object was to rise in rebellion against the confederacy and after committing all the outrage possible to go north and fight against the confederacy. Under the circumstances then prevailing such a charge sworn to and filed in the hands of the vigilance committee almost amounted to a death sentence, and but for the cooler heads among the mob and the good sense and wise supervision of a conservative and honest vigilance committee would have caused the death of old man Holt.
“A young man appeared at about the same time, Mr. Cox, tried to escape from the guards and was shot and mortally wounded. This man had been guilty of no offense, nor had Holt. Both were prisoners suffering from Beard’s lies. It is true that after the excitement had been aroused to the fever heat he retracted his charges and admitted that his entire testimony was false. But this was not announced until the chairman of the vigilance committee read out the testimony to the crowd and also the retraction. It was learned for the first time that Hous Holt learned upon whose testimony his father had been so wrongfully imprisoned and threatened with death. Smarting with the wrong done his father and feeling that the man had cruelly and causelessly wronged the old man, Holt went to the house where Beard was and killed him. His crime, committed under the sudden heat of passion, was nothing more than man-slaughter.” Were all other men indicted and convicted for all the technical and real violations of law committed during the war, then it would be proper to punish Houston Holt, perhaps, but I know of no reason for singling him out as the only one to punish for a war time act. As for the Powers case, I have only to say that Holt was tried by as good a jury as ever assembled in Cooke county, found guilty of murder in the second degree and served his sentence without motion for a new trial or appeal. And besides, he has served nine years for killing Beard. No one can complain that Holt was not well prosecuted in the Powers case, when the state was represented by Judge J. M. Hurt, Senator Emory Smith, Judge D. E. Barrett and Lovejoy and Dixon



Hous, born about 1837 in Tennessee, was the son of James & Ann Holt. He is listed as 12 year old Northley H. Holt in the James Holt household in 1850 census of Tishomingo County, Tennessee. He is also listed as Northly Holt, age 22, in the 1860 census of Sugar Loaf, Arkansas.

Hous left Arkansas and moved to Texas in July of 1860. On the 25 July 1860, N. H. Holt buys land located on the waters of the Choctaw Bayou in Grayson County, Texas from Susan West Leffel. Susan's niece, Sarah, later marries Hous.

On 18 Mar 1863, N. Houston Holt marries Sarah A. Dale in Grayson County, Texas. Sarah Ann West Dale is the divorced wife of Calvin Dale.

Hous and Sarah Holt can be found listed in the 1870 census for Sherman, Grayson County, Texas. He is listed as N. H. Holt age 30 born Tennessee, a farmer, $2000 real property, $100 personal property, wife, Sarah A., 30, f, m, keeping house, Illinois. They have two children, James F.S. age 7 and Nina B. age 5. Sarah's widowed mother, Barbara West, is also living with them.